Month: October 2019

Louisa Boyd

Louisa Boyd

How did you become involved in artist’s books? I first started making artist’s books as I was using sketchbooks in an unusual manner – cutting through pages to make complex images that relied on the pages before and after them to complete them. From this,…

Marches Book Arts Group

Marches Book Arts Group

Marches Book Arts Group comprises makers at every level, from those just discovering the joys of book arts to professional artists renowned for their artist’s books. We come from, and share our skills, in a variety of disciplines from textiles and paper sculpture, to calligraphy,…

Christine Nicholls Inkpot and Pen

Christine Nicholls Inkpot and Pen

How did you become involved in artist’s books?

I first came across artist’s books at the exhibition Certain Trees: The Constructed Book, Poem and Object 1964-2008, tucked away in a room at the top of the V&A Museum in 2008. Locked away in a case was a small book called ‘Adjectives for Grasses’ by Moschantel Press with Laurie Clarke’s illustration on the cover. I couldn’t tear my eyes away from this book, desperate to see inside, which I have never managed to do! 
After returning about four times before the exhibition closed I kept the thought of this book hidden away, in a secret drawer in my mind.
Roll on a few years later when I was started working full time on my own illustration and lettering work having deciding to leave paid employment and the memory of the book returned. At that point I started researching the world of artist’s books as a way of bringing together my drawings and ideas in a form that could be ‘discovered’ rather than just seen on a flat surface in a frame.

What is the focus of your practice?

I’m interested in using the book format to tell a story through the use of illustration and words/lettering; whether it is street furniture or over looked everyday items, to explore the world of a flower, from bud to folklore, to explore the world around us through illustrated maps that use a particular fold that allows you to fall into the world of the map when you open it. 

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m currently working on expanding my series maps and I’m also exploring ways to bring lettering and illustration together within my books, where they feature as one image rather than supporting each other. This journey is in its infancy and is currently following its own path…

instagram @inkpotandpen

Lynne Barker

Lynne Barker

How did you become involved in artist’s books? I see the artist’s book as the ideal form to act as an archive for my drawings. The book form makes them easily available to others.  What is the focus of your practice? I am interested in…

Anja Uhren

Anja Uhren

How did you become involved in artist’s books? I’ve always been fascinated by sequential art and books are the perfect medium to deliver a variety of messages and stories which to me is the most natural way to express my creativity.  What is the focus…

Less Than 500 Press

Less Than 500 Press

Mark Callard/ Foxhole Magazine

How did you become involved in artist’s books?

About ten years ago, I started writing poetry as a way of staying sane during a long period of mental ill health and rubbish jobs. My friend’s sister is a graphic designer, and so between the three of us, we edited my work down and created a book, but one that also had a strong visual identity. I also made an A4 zine on the photocopier at my local Staple and took copies of that and the poetry book to sell at the Alternative Press fair in London. I hadn’t been to many events like it but have always been a book and comic nerd, so I immediately fell in love with all the weird and wonderful things that people were making and selling, things that existed without anyone’s backing or an official stamp of approval. From there, I started making more books and zines, exhibited at as many zine fairs and DIY art markets as I could. Eventually I went back to University in my mid-30’s to study Graphic Design and Visual Art, as I wanted to learn how to have a go at some of the things I was seeing at the events I’d been attending. Once I was no longer a poor student, I started doing Artists Book Fairs up and down the country (because it’s not all about London).


What is the focus of your practice?

My three years at University were great but left me with mixed feelings about the various disciplines, or where I fitted in. I was in the Graphic Design class but I hung out with the Fine Art students in the room next door, so I got the best of both worlds but was also aware of things I didn’t like about both practices. I’m interested in content and like to create something people can engage with, rather than just saying ‘that looks nice’ and forgetting about it five minutes later, or not engaging with it at all because it needs to be explained. I would say my work is about stories and narratives, places, time, textures and decay (amongst other things) but how and when any of these themes might appear will vary from one project to the next.


What are you working on at the moment?

Two photography zines featuring visits to Chernobyl and Hong Kong, and a new issue of Foxhole zine, which is a collection of other people’s writing, art and photography. The new issue has been curated by photographer Mary Scott, which is the first time I’ve handed the reins over to someone else, so I’m looking forward to seeing how different this issue is compared to the ones I’ve curated. 

Twitter: @foxholemagazine

Instagram: foxhole_magazine maryscottart

 

Jan Hopkins

Jan Hopkins

What is the focus of your practice? For me the artist’s book moves in and out of the digital realm. I work with machine generated text printed on demand by mini printers driven by Raspberry Pi computers, images drawn by robot and text on screens,…

Nise McCulloch

Nise McCulloch

How did you become involved in artist’s books? By accident really. Books and literature have always been central to my career & voluntary work. I was working on a writing project exploring destruction in literature which turned into a wider, interdisciplinary artistic venture producing a…

Grania Hayes

Grania Hayes

How did you get involved in artist’s books?

I became involved in making artists books whilst printmaking with Michelle Avison at Morley College. One day she suggested we should make books.  At first, I was reluctant, but I had a go and I cut vinyl shapes and printed a pamphlet book. That was a good ten years ago and since then I cannot stop. It is intriguing and exciting to experiment.

What is the focus of your practice?

The focus of my practice is telling a story even if it might appear to be abstract.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am currently working on cut, paste and photocopy. The resulting images are then made into pamphlet books.

My current project is using the above technique to tell the story of the people and animals on Primrose Hill in London which is where I live.

Kim Bevan

Kim Bevan

How did you become involved in artists books ? I first found out about artists books whilst I was doing my Master’s in Fine Art at Leeds. My lecturer, Chris Taylor, showed us a range of books as part of a group session and then…