Tag: artists book fair

Sarah Grace Dye

Sarah Grace Dye

How did you become involved with artist’s books? Years ago when I was teaching at the Arts University Bournemouth we taught a unit about artist’s books. During the unit the students learnt how to make paper and had sessions to introduce them to a number…

David Barton

David Barton

How did you become involved in artist’s books? From 1964 until his death in December 1966 I was a student of the late Anton Ehrenzweig and began a series of what he called “Tease & Worry” books. In these notebooks, drawings, paintings and written texts…

Holly Serjeant

Holly Serjeant

How did you become involved in artists’ books?

I did my degree in Bookbinding and Calligraphy which gave me a good grounding in techniques employed to create a range of different bindings. I’ve exhibited my work at Manchester and Liverpool Artists Book Fairs where a shared love of book art has been an inspiration to me.

What is the focus of your practice?

I restore treasured old books on a daily basis. I love the thought that these books provide a window to the past while often going on to outlive their author or owner. In contrast I use decorative and marbled papers, leathers and bookcloth to create new bindings of varying shapes and structures.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m in the process of designing some little instructional books & kits to encourage others to experience the joys of book arts.

Girasol Press

Girasol Press

How did you become involved in artist’s books? Haphazardly, really. We – that’s Leire Barrera Medrano and Dan Eltringham – did a letterpress workshop in London with the marvellous Pixel Press, and caught the slow-speed bug there. We bought our letterpress, trays of type, rollers,…

Jacqui Dodds

Jacqui Dodds

How did you become involved in artist’s books? After graduating with a Fine Art Degree, I was invited to take part in funded projects where I explored place and objects within them.  I found artist’s books an accessible way to show my printmaking work without it being…

A. Rosemary Watson

A. Rosemary Watson

How did you become involved in artist’s books?

I became interested in artist’s books almost 20 years ago through a friend who created artist’s books. Over the years I visited, artists’ book fairs and attended workshops and gradually the media formed part of my practice as a means of expression 

What is the focus of your practice?

The majority of the bookworks form part of a larger body of work concerned with notions of memory, exploring a personal response to and a forming a record of the constantly shifting and multi-layered nature of memory of a particular place, in which wishful beliefs, imagination, hard facts and dreams blend and blur over time into a personalised version of history. It is a process that is continually explored developed and refined as the memories themselves constantly reshape and reform assuming greater or lesser significance, in which the memory has been reduced over time to an abstraction of line and space, the memory-image formed by light falling across blind embossed paper.

What are you working on at the moment? 

The current bookworks form an aspect of an ongoing, open-ended, print-based project researching the inter-relationship between the 2-dimensional printed image / the book format and the sculptural form by means of hand-cutting and folding 2-dimensional prints to create artists books and book objects.

www.arosemarywatson.co.uk

Best Books by Bernard and Anwyl

Best Books by Bernard and Anwyl

How did you become involved in artist’s books? Both of us got involved through an art tutor who introduced us to the vast breadth of creative possibilities and options within the field of book arts when we were studying for Fine Art MAs.  What is…

Theresa Easton

Theresa Easton

How did you become involved in artist’s books? During an MA in Glass at Sunderland University in 2008.  I struggled to find a context for the screen-printed enamelled glass I wanted to make so I approached Newcastle’s Literary and Philosophical Library to which I belonged. …

Kiss and Tell Press/Michael Wynne

Kiss and Tell Press/Michael Wynne

How did you become involved in artist’s books?

I’d been a writer for about twenty years when I began to feel I wanted more than words. Photography is an old love of mine that I’d kind of forgotten for thirty years. I started taking pictures of friends, lovers and strangers, and began to make photobooks. In the beginning my practice was so private that I just did whatever I wanted – with a bit of help from YouTube videos! Then I allowed myself to do bad illustrations and made zines out of them. I guess, in a way, it all happened organically – this search for other ways to engage with the book form – but was also unexpected. Writing was always how I identified what I do, then gradually I was an artist. Then, about five years ago, a weekend bookbinding workshop at City Lit in London changed everything and opened up new possibilities for me. What I realised as soon as I started studying bookbinding, is that my love for books is just as much for books as objects than it is for what happens inside them. 

What is the focus of your practice?

My main focus is trying to make sense of the world. Relationships, sex, Brexit, trauma, PTSD, life in a war zone, how we survive and keep going. I’m very interested in what happens when two people are in a room alone together, and I’m interesting in exploring ways to make sense through mark-making on paper, through abstraction. After a lifetime of relying solely on words – writing is the hardest artform – I like the playfulness and experimentation that visual art allows. 

What are you working on at the moment?

I’ve just finished a big artist’s book called Brexit. That was exhausting and abstract, so I’m back to words and trying to finish a couple of novels I’ve been working on for a while. I’m also working on a photobook about sweets and chocolates.

instagram @michael_wynne_

kissandtellpress.com/

Bethan Maddocks & Remi Bec

Bethan Maddocks & Remi Bec

How did you become involved in artist’s books? It’s all thanks to who we grew up with! Both of us individually have always been drawn to paper and how you can shape and manipulate it, and books are a very direct way of exploring and displaying that…